Immerse yourself in the stunning natural beauty of the Italian Dolomites and discover world-class skiing, sublime hiking, and unique culture in this picturesque region of northern Italy.

By: Paul Healy | Published: 18 May 2023 | Last update: 21 Nov 2023

The Italian Dolomites, situated in the northeast of the country, form a mountain range celebrated for its rugged peaks, crystalline alpine lakes, and pristine natural beauty.

Blessed with lush valleys, vibrant flora and fauna, and a dramatic tapestry of mountain vistas, the Dolomites offer an idyllic playground for outdoor enthusiasts, foodies, and nature lovers.

Embark on an exhilarating hike, challenge yourself to a thrilling via ferrata, bask in the tranquillity of a serene retreat, or immerse yourself in the captivating fusion of mountain cultures.

After several visits to the Italian Dolomites, we’ve put together this detailed guide on visiting the area. We cover the layout, best places to stay, what to see and do as well as important visiting information.

WHAT ARE THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES?

The Dolomites are the eastern section of the northern Italian Alps, a mountain region made up of glaciers, lakes, forests, and mountains. They are known for their distinctive and striking rock formations including spires, pinnacles, and sheer vertical walls.

Located in the Italian regions of Veneto, Trentino-Alto/Südtirol, and Friuli-Venezia Giulia, the Dolomites were designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site for their natural beauty and geological significance in 2009.

The area is ideal for hiking and cycling while deep valleys and steep cliffs provide the perfect playground for via ferrata and climbing. With over 1,200 kilometres of ski slopes and 450 lifts, the Dolomites is also one of the largest ski areas in the world.  

LAYOUT OF THE DOLOMITES

The Dolomites cover an area of around 140,000 hectares. The mountain range is roughly 250 kilometres long and 100 kilometres wide with a total of 18 peaks above 3,000 metres in altitude.

The area can be divided into 3 distinct regions, each with its own unique landscape.

LAYOUT | REGIONS OF THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES


EASTERN DOLOMITES

Extremely rugged mountains separated by turquoise lakes.

CENTRAL DOLOMITES

Long chains of interestingly shaped mountains and soaring pinnacles.

WESTERN DOLOMITES

Long narrow valleys surrounded by vertical walls and sheer cliffs.

layout of the italian dolomites

MAP | REGIONS OF THE DOLOMITES

We have organised this guide via the 3 regions of the Italian Dolomites including what to see and do in each area, as well as recommendations for where to stay.  

How to use this map / Click on the top left of the map to display the list of locations, then click on the locations to display further information. Click on the top right corner of the map to open a larger version in a new tab or the star to save to your Google Maps.  


ITALIAN DOLOMITES GUIDE – EASTERN DOLOMITES

The Eastern Dolomites are characterised by extremely rugged terrain made up of distinctive red and grey rock formations. With beautiful turquoise lakes tucked into the folds of the landscape, the area offers some of the most scenic hikes in the Dolomites.

Cortina d’Ampezzo is the best central base in the Eastern Dolomites, a lovely town with a mix of traditional restaurants and high-end dining and shopping.

Why go to the Eastern Dolomites?

  • Stunning rugged alpine scenery with the best turquoise lakes in the Dolomites
  • Excellent hiking including the exceptional Tre Cime di Lavaredo hike.
  • Some of the best cable car rides in the Dolomites.
  • A diverse mix of hotels and eating options.
  • One of the premier ski resorts in Italy.
eastern dolomites scenery

BEST THINGS TO DO IN THE EASTERN DOLOMITES

1 – HIKE TRE CIME DI LAVAREDO

Possibly the finest hike in the entire Italian Dolomites, the Tre Cime di Lavaredo loop offers stunning views of the three distinctive rocky peaks rising above a sea of barren rock.

Numerous rifugios on route provide wonderful breaks with stunning views and hearty Italian cooking. The trail is easy to follow with several scenic rest stops along the way.

All the details are on our guide to hiking Tre Cime di Lavaredo.

TRE CIME DI LAVAREDO //

How far – 10.3 kilometres | How long – 3 hours, 20 minutes | How hard – 400 metres of elevation

2 – TAKE A BOAT ON LAGO DI BRAIES

Lago di Braies is a picture-perfect lake and one of the most recognisable images of the Italian Dolomites. The vibrant turquoise lake is surrounded by blonde-shingle beaches and backed by sheer rocky cliffs.

There are great photo opportunities from the shore but the best way to see it is via one of the wooden-paneled boats that extract every ounce of romanticism they can muster.

It’s an unmissable attraction in the Dolomites and you can find the best way to spend the day there on our Lago di Braies guide.

3 – TAKE THE GONDOLA TO LAGAZUOI & TOFANA

Heading high into the upper reaches of the Eastern Dolomites are two exceptional cable cars (Gondolas).

The Tofana-Freccia nel Cielo cable car rises from just outside Cortina to Cima Tofana (3,244m) from where it is a short hike to Tofana di Mezzo, the third-highest peak in the Italian Dolomites. The views from here over the Sorapiss, Sexten, and Cristallo groups are exceptional.

The Lagazuoi Cable Car climbs to Rifugio Lagazoui (2,753m) at the top of Falzarego Pass – a high pass that connects Bolzano with Cortina d’Ampezzo. Set on the side of Mount Lagazuoi, this “castle of rock” is peppered with spires and turrets, as well as military bases built during World War I.

4 – PHOTO LAGO DI SORAPIS

Lago di Braies may attract the most visitors, but Lago di Sorapis is equally as stunning. This high alpine lake, situated on a secluded ledge and surrounded by the rugged slopes of Mount Sorapis (3,200 m), offers one of the most captivating experiences in the Dolomites.

The serene turquoise lake is reached via a moderately challenging hike, encompassing forested trails, narrow ledges, and breathtaking panoramic vistas overlooking Tre Cime.

All the details including the best way to get to and from the lake are in our guide to hiking to Lago di Sorapis.  

5 – TAKE ON YOUR FIRST VIA FERRATA

Via ferratas are protected climbing routes that enable you to traverse steep and exposed sections using steel cables, steps, and ladders. There are numerous courses in the Dolomites, but if you’re new to this exhilarating activity, the Eastern Dolomites are an excellent starting point to embark on your first Via Ferrata or “Iron Road” adventure.

Via Ferrata degli Alpini: This shorter 3-to-5-hour course is ideal for beginners and families. With a total ascent of 400 meters, it offers options to bypass the more challenging sections. The starting point is located 4 kilometers away from Cortina.

Via Ferrata Marino Bianchi: This intermediate-level course leads to the summit of Monte Cristallo di Mezzo. From the very beginning until the breathtaking 3,000-meter summit, the views will leave you in awe. Completing this via ferrata typically takes around 6 to 7 hours, with an elevation gain of 920 meters.

6 – SOAK UP THE ATMOSPHERE IN CORTINA D’AMPEZZO

Cortina d’Ampezzo serves as the central hub of the Eastern Dolomites. Famed for its picturesque mountain views, opulent lodging, upscale shopping, and vibrant nightlife, it’s a perfect getaway from the rugged natural beauty surrounding the town.

During the summer season, the plethora of dining options around Cortina d’Ampezzo offers an excellent way to unwind after a day spent in the mountains.

In winter, it transforms into one of the premier ski resorts in Italy, with 140 ski runs and over 50 miles of cross-country pistes.

WHERE TO STAY IN EASTERN DOLOMITES

The best place to stay in the Eastern Dolomites is Cortina. It’s centrally located and has some decent bus services, making it not too difficult to get to the main sights. Although hiring a car will save you time.

Another good option is Dobbiaco which has good transport links to Lago di Braies.

CORTINA

CRISTALLO RESORT AND SPA

Just a 5-minute walk to the center, this was the first luxury hotel in town. It has an indoor pool, a sumptuous spa, and all the trimmings you would expect


DOBBIACO

HOTEL ROSEGARTEN

Family-run property in the centre of Dobbiaco, Hotel Rosegarten has a traditional restaurant, excellent views, and breakfast for champions


PRATO PIAZZA (PLÄTZWIESE)

HOHE GAISL

Hohe Gaisl is a comfortable mountain hotel with traditional South Tyrol stylings and a restaurant that does an excellent set menu in the evenings. The location is exceptional and the views are incredible.


ITALIAN DOLOMITES GUIDE – CENTRAL DOLOMITES

The central region of the Dolomites is characterized by vast chains of majestic peaks and distinctively shaped mountains. Towering pinnacles punctuate the lush green meadows, while impressive rock formations emerge from the rugged and desolate landscapes.

Nowhere else in the Dolomites can you encounter scenery as otherworldly as the rocky barren landscapes found here.

During the winter season, avid skiers gather to experience the exhilarating slopes of Val Gardena and Alta Badia.

Why go to the Central Dolomites?

  • Ethereal scenery unlike anywhere else in the Dolomites.
  • Great mix of day hikes for people with all abilities.
  • Numerous cable cars to exceptional destinations.
  • Hair-raising passes of the Great Dolomite Road – perfect for road trips or cycling adventures.
  • Decent network of bus and cable cars.
central dolomites guide

BEST THINGS TO DO IN THE CENTRAL DOLOMITES

7 – SEE STUNNING VAL DI FUNES

The quaint churches of Val di Funes nestled amongst rolling green meadows under jagged spires of rock have become an iconic Dolomites image on Instagram. But this charming valley also has excellent hiking, beautiful villages, and an expansive nature park.

There are easy trails like the Panoramaweg and Sunnseitenweg that leaves from the picture-perfect village of Santa Maddalena and meanders through hay meadows and rolling farmland.

Alternatively, the more challenging Adolf Munkel Trail cuts under the jagged spires of the Puez-Odle group and visits some of the loveliest rifugios you’ll find anywhere.

For more details, read our complete guide to visiting Val di Funes.

8 – EXPLORE THE MEADOWS OF ALPE DI SIUSI

Alpe di Siusi is a stunning alpine meadow in the heart of the Italian Dolomites. Surrounded by towering peaks and soaring pinnacles, its sweeping panoramic views make it a popular location for hiking in summer. Alternatively, with an e-bike, you can explore the entire area in a few hours.

Make sure you save time for lunch as there are some wonderful options. Here are our favourite rifugios on Alpe di Siusi:

  • Gostner Schwaige for traditional Dolomites dishes with refined twists
  • Rauchhütte serves alpine food including their famous venison ragu and locally sourced steak, accompanied by a serious wine list.
  • Gostner Schwaige provides a gourmet dining experience at 3,000 feet with locally sourced food from the alpine meadows. Don’t miss the Heublütensuppe – a soup made from hay, flowers, and herbs and served in bread.

In winter, the meadow transforms into a playground with excellent snowboarding, skiing, and winter sports.

9 – PHOTOGRAPH SECEDA & THE PUEZ-ODLE GROUP

There are few places in the world as awe-inspiring as the view from the Seceda summit, where the jagged teeth of the Puez-Odle range showcase the raw power and beauty of nature.

Bent and contorted, these majestic peaks stretch into the vastness of the horizon, seemingly vanishing into eternity and often adorned with a cloak of mysterious-looking cloud.

The best bit is that you don’t even need to embark on a challenging hike to savour this extraordinary sight. Simply board the Furnes-Seceda cable car in Ortisei, and within a short walk, you’ll find yourself around 100 metres away from the breathtaking viewpoint.

10 – HIKE AMONGST SOARING PINNACLES

The landscape in the central Dolomites is varied and unique. Some of the most captivating scenery can be witnessed on several exhilarating day hikes. You can find a complete list of our favourite walks in our best hikes in the Dolomites guide, but here are a few standout choices:

Adolf Munkel Trail: Embark on a half-day exploration through the jagged spires of the Puez-Odle group.

The Sassolungo Circuit: The full-day circuit around the peaks of Sassolungo-Langkofel is a remarkable adventure with excellent rifugios on route. More details are in our guide to hiking the Sassolungo circuit.

Vajolet Towers: This medium-length hike presents a thrilling and challenging journey through a rocky wilderness.

11 – CATCH REFLECTIONS AT LAGO DI CAREZZA

Lago di Carezza is a stunning alpine lake located in Val d’Ega. Mirroring the spiky Latemar mountains, the emerald waters perfectly reflect the sunlight, earning it the nickname “Lake of the Rainbow.”

The lake is fed by underground springs so the water level rises and falls with the seasons. The best time to visit is in early spring when the snow has melted, and the lake starts to rise.

Tall trees in front of the reflective Lago di Carezza with rocky mountains behind clouds
LAGO DI CAREZZA, ITALIAN DOLOMITES

12 – DRIVE OR CYCLE THE CENTRAL DOLOMITE PASSES

The Central Dolomites boast several magnificent mountain passes, each offering breathtaking views. These steep and winding roads provide an exhilarating experience for cyclists or the destination for a scenic car trip. Here are some of the best routes to explore in the central Dolomites:

Passo Gardena: Sitting at an elevation of 2,136 meters, Passo Gardena connects Val Gardena with Val Badia, treating travellers to jaw-dropping views of the majestic Puez-Odle peaks and Fanes Group.

Passo Sella: Stretching over a 12-kilometer windy road, Passo Sella links Val di Fassa with Val Gardena. Along this route, you’ll encounter the towering peaks of Sassolungo and the impressive rocky monolith of the Sella group.

Passo Pordoi: As one of the four passes on the Great Dolomites Road, Passo Pordoi boasts 28 hairpin bends as it winds its way from the town of Canazei to the summit at 2,239 meters.

13 – RIDE THE GONDOLA UP TO SASS PORDOI

After driving to the top of the Passo Pordoi, don’t miss the opportunity to take the cable car to Sass Pordoi. Climbing 700 metres in just a couple of minutes, it deposits you in a 2,950-metre- high rocky wilderness.

The views from here are as good as anywhere in the Dolomites. The Sella Massif is like a massive sheer-sided boulder and the three peaks of Sassolungo lie just across the valley.

The adventurous hike across the rocky desolation of Piz Boe starts from the top of Sass Pordoi.

14 – EXPLORE COLOURFUL BOLZANO

Bolzano, the capital of the province of South Tyrol, is a charming town nestled in a picturesque part of the Dolomites. What sets Bolzano apart is its captivating fusion of Italian and Austrian culture, creating a unique and vibrant atmosphere.

Bolzano is an excellent destination, especially on a rainy day, with several authentic cafes where you can try the local specialty, speck – a cured ham with its origins in the town.

Furthermore, Bolzano serves as a convenient starting point for exploring the magnificent Great Dolomite Road.

At the heart of the town, the vibrant Piazza Walther is adorned with charming pastel-coloured townhouses all overlooking a backdrop of grassy meadows.

paul mark 1
ANYWHERE WE ROAM IS
READER-SUPPORTED

When you buy through links on our site, we may earn a small affiliate commission at no extra cost to you.

You can also shout us a coffee.

Thanks for your support – Paul & Mark.

bmc button

INSTAGRAM | FACEBOOK

WHERE TO STAY IN CENTRAL DOLOMITES

There are several good locations to stay in the Central Dolomites.

Just a few miles apart, and connected by a regular bus, the towns of Selva and Ortisei in Val Gardena have the best access to the finest walks and views. Cable cars head up to Seceda, Alpe de Siusi, and Sassolungo. Passo Gardena and Passo Sella are just a short drive away.

With so much on the doorstep, it’s a great place to stay if you don’t want to hire a car.

Alternatively, Val Di Funes is a delightfully quiet and stunning part of the central Dolomites. It makes a great stop for a couple of days.

STUNNING VIEWS

PROIHOF

Set amidst rolling fields in the most picturesque part of the valley, the views are sensational and the alpine furnishings are charming. There’s a 2-night minimum.


ORTISEI

RESIDENCE LARCIUNEI

Residence Larciunei is a family-run chalet smack in the centre of Ortisei with fully equipped kitchenettes. Ski slopes are 600 metres away.


SELVA DI VAL GARDENA

CHALET PRA RONCH

With ski-to-door access and close proximity to some great hiking, Chalet Pra Ronch is the perfect summer or winter stay.


central dolomites guide

ITALIAN DOLOMITES GUIDE – WESTERN DOLOMITES

The Western Dolomites are located in the Trentino-Alto Adige region and include the Brenta Dolomites and the Adamello-Presanella group.

Characterized by towering limestone peaks cut with vertical walls and ledges, the distinctive pink-hued rock formations that have given the Dolomites its UNESCO World Heritage Site listing, are most evident here.

The mountains are less uniquely shaped than the other two regions, but with easy access to vineyards and historic Trento, the area offers a more diverse experience.

Why go to the Western Dolomites?

  • The most iconic Via Ferrata and rock climbing in the Dolomites.
  • Narrow valleys with deep green forests and plunging waterfalls.
  • The charming historic town of Trento.
  • Exceptional wineries in the Trentino Valley.
  • Luxurious stays in Madonna di Campiglio.
western dolomites guide

BEST THINGS TO DO IN THE WESTERN DOLOMITES

15 – ATTEMPT LE BOCCHETTE VIA FERRATA

One of the most famous networks of cabled pathways in the Dolomites is Le Bocchette, an exhilarating via ferrata utilising the vertical walls of the Western Dolomites.

Unlike other vie ferrate that require gradually climbing from the bottom to the top, Le Bocchette follows a horizontal route, edging along natural ledges in the rock.

It’s not technically difficult, but it’s very exposed with a wall of rock on one side and a 500-metre drop on the other.

It takes around 3 hours to complete and is not for the faint of heart.

16 – HIKE IN THE BRENTA DOLOMITES

Less visited than the other two regions, hiking in the Western Dolomites is a more remote experience. One of the best places is the Brenta Dolomites.

The most spectacular walk takes you up close to the vertical walls and rocky summits that define the area. Start at the top of the Grostè Gondola and slowly descend through a rocky wonderland to the town of Madonna di Campiglio.

GROSTÈ GONDOLA TO MADONNA DI CAMPIGLIO HIKE //

How far – 18 kilometres | How long – 6 hours | How hard – 200 metres of ascent; 1,300 metres of descent.

Another good option is the 5 Lakes Walk which starts at the top of the Cinque Laghi cable car and includes lovely Lago Ritorto and Lago Nambino. All the details are in our day hikes in the Dolomites guide.

17 – EXPLORE VAL GENOVA

Val Genova is a narrow, forested valley sometimes called the valley of waterfalls thanks to its abundance of beautiful cascades.

Two of the finest are Cascate Nardis and Cascate Di Laris. Easily reached from the road, they are both just a short walk through shaded woodland.

The whole valley is a gentle and peaceful place, which feels a world away from the rugged mountain scenery surrounding it.  Bring a picnic or grab lunch at one of the rifugios in the valley for a different but equally rewarding activity in the Dolomites.

18 – SKI AT LUXURIOUS MADONNA DI CAMPIGLIO

The town of Madonna di Campiglio is a wonderful year-round destination. In summer, it attracts outdoor enthusiasts with opportunities for hiking, mountain biking, climbing, and paragliding. During the winter months, the town transforms into a lively ski resort.

The area is renowned for its extensive network of well-groomed slopes and modern ski lifts that cater to both beginners and experienced skiers. It also has a great après-ski scene with vibrant nightlife, local restaurants, and elegant dining options.

Nestled beneath the Brenta Dolomites, Madonna di Campiglio has a cosy atmosphere with chalet-style architecture and charming streets lined with boutiques making it a great base for your Dolomites stay.

madonna di campiglio italian dolomites

19 – STROLL HISTORIC TRENTO

Trento is a charming, picturesque city in the Trentino-Alto Adige region with beautiful streets adorned with medieval and Renaissance-era buildings.

It’s a wonderful place to visit in the Italian Dolomites and a lovely diversion from the dramatic mountain scenery. Here are some great things to do in Trento:

  • Piazza Duomo: The heart of the city, Piazza Duomo, is a vibrant square surrounded by historic buildings and charming cafes. It is home to the impressive Trento Cathedral, a magnificent Romanesque-Gothic.
  • Castello del Buonconsiglio and Gardens: This medieval castle consists of several buildings, each reflecting different historical periods. Inside, you can explore beautifully decorated rooms, courtyards, and a museum that showcases art and historical artifacts.
  • Museo delle Scienze (MUSE): Known as the Museum of Sciences, MUSE is an innovative and interactive museum that explores various scientific and natural topics.
  • Palazzo delle Albere: This unique Renaissance-style palace is known for its striking architecture and hosts contemporary art exhibitions. It is surrounded by a park, offering a serene setting for a relaxing walk or picnic.
  • Sardagna Cable Car: Take the cable car to Sardagna for breathtaking views on route to this charming hillside village.
  • Castle Toblino: A picturesque lake fortress adorned with beautiful frescoes and paintings of medieval musical instruments.

20 – GO WINE TASTING IN THE TRENTINO VALLEY

Nestled in the foothills of the Dolomites, the Trento Valley is a beautiful wine-growing area where production is mostly done by small family-owned wineries. The chilly alpine climate is excellent for cultivating complex cabernet sauvignon and pinot noir.

Most wine is sold locally with minimal exports so visiting the local vineyards while in the Dolomites is a great thing to do.

Ferrari Trentino // Learn about its 100-year history in the atmospheric cellars at Ferrari Trento. The opulent 16th-century villa is stunning. Lunch and wine tasting can be booked ranging from €85 to €265.

Cantina Tramin // Set in a stunning location, Cantina Tramin is a celebration of art, design, architecture, and of course, wine. Guided tours with wine tasting can be booked starting from €17.

Cantina Rotari // Cantina Rotari maximise the unique mountain climate of Trentino to produce sparkling wines from Chardonnay and Pinot grapes.

Alois Lageder Paradeis // This family-run winery uses classical grape varieties to produce wines in harmony with the natural elements of the area. Informative guided tours explain the production process and finish with lunch prepared with local organic ingredients.

WHERE TO STAY IN WESTERN DOLOMITES

The best place to stay to visit the Western Dolomites is Madonna di Campiglio. A lively town with plenty of facilities. Several cable cars offer easy access to the best walks, climbs, and rifugios.

MADONNA DI CAMPIGLIO

HOTEL ALPINA

Great value hotel in the centre of town just a few minutes walk from the ski lifts. The facilities are good and bikes are available to rent.


MADONNA DI CAMPIGLIO

BIO HOTEL HERMITAGE

A beautiful hotel with panoramic views of the Brenta Dolomites. The spa is a great way to unwind after a long day exploring.


MADONNA DI CAMPIGLIO

DV CHALET BOUTIQUE HOTEL & SPA

This luxurious property tickets all the design elements including alpine finishes and modern touches. The restaurant is one of the best fine-dining places in town.


western dolomites where to stay

BEST TIME TO VISIT THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Generally, the best time to visit the Dolomites is between May to July when most of the hiking trails will be open and the weather will be more agreeable. However, this is a mountainous area and weather patterns can be unpredictable. Always check the forecast before venturing out.

SUMMER IN THE DOLOMITES (JUNE TO SEPTEMBER)

Summer is the peak season in the Dolomites with mild temperatures and long days making it perfect for hiking, cycling, and other outdoor activities. With the wildflowers in bloom, the alpine meadows will be spectacular.

FALL IN THE DOLOMITES (OCTOBER TO NOVEMBER)

Autumn is a beautiful time to visit the Dolomites with the leaves changing colour and the crowds reducing. The weather is cool but several of the hiking trails are still open.

WINTER IN THE DOLOMITES (DECEMBER TO FEBRUARY)

Winter is the perfect time to visit the Dolomites if you are into skiing and snowboarding. With some of the largest ski resorts in Italy, you’ll enjoy over 1,200 kilometres of slopes.

SPRING IN THE DOLOMITES (MARCH TO MAY)

Spring in the Dolomites can be unpredictable with snow still present at higher altitudes, so although the weather is improving, some hiking trails may be inaccessible. The wildflowers will be starting to bloom at lower altitudes and hiking and bike riding in these regions could be stunning.

when to visit the dolomites italy

HOW TO GET TO THE DOLOMITES

By Air // The Dolomites is serviced by several international airports, the most convenient are Venice, Innsbruck, and Verona.

By Train // The main railway route in the Dolomites is the Verona to Munch line which includes stops at Trento and Bolzano.

By Car // The most convenient way to get into the Dolomites is to drive. The roads are good and although there are plenty of twisting hairpin turns, there is nothing particularly difficult.

DRIVING DISTANCES TO CORTINA

As one of the most central towns, the below table will give you an idea of how long it will take to drive into the Dolomites. 


Bolzano

130 kilometres | 2.25 hours

Venice

162 kilometres | 2.25 hours

Innsbruck (Austria)

165 kilometres | 2.5 hours

Verona

260 kilometres | 3.25 hours

Lake Garda (Sirmione)

290 kilometres | 3.5 hours

Bologna

295 kilometres | 3.5 hours

HOW LONG DO YOU NEED IN THE DOLOMITES?

The Italian Dolomites are a vast and diverse region with many different attractions, so you could easily spend a week or more exploring the area.

DAY TRIP TO THE DOLOMITES

If you are short on time, you can see some of the highlights of the Dolomites on a day trip from either Venice, Verona, Lake Garda, or Bolzano.

Here are a couple of well-rated tours.

A WEEKEND IN THE DOLOMITES

If you have a long weekend, choose between Val Gardena and the Central Dolomites or Cortina and the Eastern Dolomites. Both are excellent central destinations with many activities to keep you occupied for 2 to 3 days.

guide to visiting the italian dolomites

1 WEEK IN THE DOLOMITES

If you have 1 week, we’d recommend splitting your time equally between the Central and Eastern Dolomites. Three days in each of Val Gardena and Cortina would give you plenty of time to see many of the highlights in each region.

If you don’t mind moving quickly, then you can visit every region by adding a night in Madonna di Campiglio in the Western Dolomites.

OUR DOLOMITES ROAD TRIP ITINERARY

Our suggested 1-week itinerary includes 4 days hiking with rest days in-between so you can collect some of the other great things to do in the Dolomites.

  • Day 1 – Passo Pardoi & The Great Dolomite Road
  • Day 2 – Tre Cime di Lavaredo
  • Day 3 – Lago di Braies & Val di Funes
  • Day 4 – Alpe di Siusi
  • Day 5 – Sassolungo
  • Day 6 – Trentino
  • Day 7 – Brenta Dolomites

All the details are on our Dolomites road trip itinerary.

THANKS FOR VISITING // WHERE NEXT?



A BIG THANK YOU

We’ve been providing free travel content on Anywhere We Roam since 2017. If you appreciate what we do, here are some ways you can support us.

Thank you!

Paul & Mark

FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM

USE OUR RESOURCES PAGE

bmc button